Friday, October 03, 2008

Soba Buckwheat Noodles

Sorry for the lack of posting yesterday! I’m in the process of moving so my internet may be down for a week or so- however long it takes for me to get everything all set up, I’m calling today so wish me luck on a speedy hookup haha
I bought many new, fun and quick ingredients while at MT market last weekend and Buckwheat Soba Noodles was amongst them. The Natural Epicurean had a potluck a few weeks back and someone served them there. Since then, I’ve been itching to make them.





I love how they’re packaged in individual serving sizes! Is it possible for a noodle to be adorable? Because I think the tiny red gingham papers are adorable.


My instructor let me know the best way to cook these is to add them to the pit while the water was still cold with just enough water to cover them. Once the water comes to a roaring the boil, add cool water to stop the boiling process. Let them come to a boil again and they should be done. Drain the noodles and run cold water through them to stop the cooking process.




I simply dressed this as a salad with some shoyu, sugar peas, scallion and fried tofu to top it off. Shoyu is a newer ingredient to me and I love it- I find it much more flavorful than regular soy sauce.

Does anyone else use it?

Teddy

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I also think soba noodles look great, but never tried them before. Do they taste good?
I only use organic shoyu in my cooking. To make shoyu they store it for two years in wooden barrels before it gets that wonderful taste. The commercial soy sauce is produced in a quick way and is'nt as healthy either.

Veg-a-Nut said...

Thanks so much for the great tip! Hope you move goes smooth and you are back up and running quickly.

Cafe Cyan said...

I have Shoyu, but I can't say I use it for any particular purpose other than soy sauce! If a recipe calls for soy sauce, I use like 70% Braggs liquid aminos, 20% Kikkoman low sodium and then like 10% Shoyu or whatever other soy sauce type thing I have in my kitchen.

Can you taste a significant difference?