Monday, August 07, 2006

Risotto Facts


Nutritional Values per 100 g
CALORIES347 kcal
PROTEIN
8 g
CARBOHYDRATES78 g
FATS0,8 g


Also Known as Aborio rice

All rice is a member of the grass family. What makes Risotto (or Aborio) special is it's high amount of starch.
This starch is what makes Risotto "creamy" without any cream.


Arborio rice, which is considered synonymous with risotto in the US, is not the only risotto rice. In fact, in Italy, rices like
carnaroli and vialone nano are also considered to be very fine risotto rices as well.

Risotto orginated in Northern Italy. Rice came to Italy sometime in the 10th century, probably brought to Sicily by Arab conquerors.



Risotto is both a dish and a technique for cooking rice.

Key Steps in cooking risotto:
Cook the rice in your veggies/wine until in it becomes translucent before you start to add your liquids. This insures that the rice will have taken on some of the oils. This is neccissary because that oil going to make kind of a water-resistant coat. The coat of oil on the rice is going to keep the starch from seeping out into the cooking liquid too quickly. If that happens, the rice would turn to mush before it's ready.

Slowly add your liquid to your rice while it's cooking. I do this by the ladel full and wait for most of the liquid to be absorbed before adding any more.

Legend has it that master glassmaker Valerius invented risotto in 1574 in Milan.


Rice is now cultivated in over 110 countries, in many different climates and environments.

Sources/good sites:
Good Eats
Season By Season
Arborio Rice

11 comments:

Urban Vegan said...

I never saw a picture of a rice plant before--even though I've seen the rice fields in Italy (Myhusband's family is from risotto country in Northern Italy). Very cool.

Urban Vegan said...

I never saw a picture of a rice plant before--even though I've seen the rice fields in Italy (Myhusband's family is from risotto country in Northern Italy). Very cool.

Cindy said...

Very cool post on aborio rice. I am a diehard and still use brown rice for my risotto. White rices are too processed. It comes out creamy even if it does take me about 2 to 2 1/2 hours to cook. Thanks for the birthday wish and the cybercake. I had a great day.

KleoPatra said...

Thanks for the rice primer there, risotto is a good one!!

Harmonia said...

I need to consume more of this...I enjoy it when I do!

:)

tara said...

Very interesting post. I don't cook much with other rices (just standard brown rice), but I have used aborio once in a recipe. Turned out well, as I recall.

Shananigans said...

Thanks for a greatly informative post, as usual :) I love risotto but don’t make it too often because of the tedious stirring over a hot stove. Definitely more suitable for winter.

Tanya Kristine said...

no WAY! risotto comes from a plant? why did i think it was made like pasta?

very interesting...thank you UV!

Crystal & Ryan - Café Cyan said...

Neat-o, I've never seen a picture of rice growing before. AND I didn't know that there were multiple kinds of risotto rice.

-Crystal

karen said...

I love risotto!!

Vicki said...

love risotto - thanks for the tips. hip grandpa w/a new computer. happy birthday, grandpa!